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Secrets of (Good) Simulation Design – Synopsis March 21, 2014

Posted by stephanieF in Best Practices, Gaming and Simulation, Intructional Design.
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Rich Mesch from Performance Development Group (PDG) joined us this month to discuss important aspects of good simulation design. By definition, a simulation is, “…a realistic controlled-risk environment where users can practice behaviors and experience the impacts of decisions.” There are several types of simulations: branching storyline (ex. choose your adventure), system dynamics (ex. decision-making over an extended time period), and equipment or software (ex. operation, or navigation and data entry).

Simulations can bridge the gap between, “learning something and then being able to do something with it.” By adding context, setting expectations for the reason a person should complete the simulation, and then providing a safe environment to practice we’ll give our audiences a better chance to learn and succeed in performing back on the job.

Good simulations are immersive, performance-based, based in reality, and have real-life goals and metrics. Storytelling is a key factor to writing simulations, but the reality factor must be performance-driven or else the audience can be distracted. And, while getting the details just right helps to replicate the environment yet instilling shades of gray where all the options for key decisions seem reasonable – can also invoke realistic and critical thinking. After all, real-life isn’t so black-and-white.

Lastly, as with all training deliverables, craft your simulation with the specific audience in mind. The power is in the design rather than the output.

For additional thoughts from Rich on simulations, check out PDG’s blog: http://blog.performdev.com/topic/simulation

This session was a great way to start our year of meetings. Stay tuned for other postings on what’s coming next. Our upcoming April session is described in a previous post, “Battle of the eLearning Tools.”  You can also see a listing of all SIG events on the ASTD Greater Philadelphia chapter web page at: http://www.astdphl.org/Default.aspx?pageId=1776221

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Coming in April 24, 2014 – Battle of the eLearning Tools! March 20, 2014

Posted by stephanieF in Announcements, e-Learning Tools.
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Have you ever been in a situation where you found yourself debating which eLearning development software was the right tool for the job? Which tool will give you everything you need with the least amount of tweaks and workarounds?

This session will be an open forum where we’ll walk through several scenarios as time permits related to designing and developing eLearning for system applications (simulations) and business processes, and developing graded quizzes, and addressing LMS compatibility. We’ll discuss/debate the pros and cons of popular tools such as Articulate Studio (Presenter, Quizmaker, Engage), Storyline, Captivate, and Lectora. Is there perhaps another OTS tool that you use every day?  For sample scenarios, please see the PDF below about this upcoming eLearning SIG session.

April 2014 SIG_Battle of the eLearning Tools_v2

Note: As an open forum everyone is welcome to participate – even if you don’t have a lot of experience and just want to learn more about the tools. For those with experience, come prepared to defend your favorite tool!

We’ll keep score and see which tool comes out ahead in each scenario. If you’d like to share a short sample in defense of your tool just let me know in advance (your demo must be less than 2 mins.). Our email: astdphl.el.sig@gmail.com

After the session we’ll post the scores and key notes from our session on this blog and ASTD Greater Phila. LinkedIn site.

Research Participation for Reusability of Learning Objects March 2, 2014

Posted by stephanieF in Announcements, Best Practices, Blogging, e-Learning Tools, Intructional Design.
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This posing is by request from a local colleague, Latonia Ayscue, who is conducting research for her doctorate in Instructional Design. If you are interested please read and click on the short Eligibility survey included below.  Thanks! – Stephanie

Attention: Instructional Designers with five or more years of experience and have reused learning objects to participate in a research study, “An Investigation of Instructional Designers’ Criteria that Predominately Influences Reusability of Learning Objects.”

Instructional Design has made significant contributions to presenting instructional material in virtual learning environments and has facilitated the way information is communicated, changed, and applied in many learning situations.

Seeking experienced ID’ers who are willing to share their experiences and provide insights into varying rationale used to identify the criteria that contributed and influenced reuse of learning objects. This research study focuses on experienced instructional designer’s practical experiences to answer the why (rationale) by exploring practices (what are users’ definitions of learning objects, value, expectations), from experienced instructional designers’ perspectives.

The research will investigate:

  • The predominate rationales practitioner’s use of learning objects.
  • The attributes of the learning objects practitioners believe should predominately influence reuse.
  • How practices are construed, formed and shaped from various points of view through vicarious experiences.
  •  The attributes that led to decisions to reuse learning objects (capturing the creativity, reasoning and intuitive thought processes when challenged to solve ill-structured problems)

To be selected to participate in this research, please go to the following link and complete a short Eligibility Questionnaire:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TYXF8SW

Your participation in the research will offer value from a practical approach to how reusable learning objects could influence intended learning and could clarify understanding how experienced instructional designers established and modified their criteria, based on the attributes, in the decision to reuse learning objects.

Thank you,
Latonia Ayscue, M.Ed., ABD